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Rockets: Horry explains why concerns over Christian Wood’s size are overblown

Christian Wood #35 of the Houston Rockets (Photo by Ronald Cortes/Getty Images)
Christian Wood #35 of the Houston Rockets (Photo by Ronald Cortes/Getty Images)
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After being practically the biggest fish in the 2020 free agent class, Christian Wood decided to sign with the Houston Rockets, receiving a slight bump in pay from what was initially reported. Wood had bounced around the league, as he’d played for 5 teams since 2015, before receiving a three-year deal with the Rockets.

Wood’s value has been on clear display, as he was playing at a All-Star level before getting injured in a February 4th victory over the Memphis Grizzlies. Wood missed the next 17 consecutive games and the Rockets lost all 17 games in his absence.

Although the 25-year-old has proven to be a clear building block for Houston Rockets GM Rafael Stone, his durability has caused some to worry, as he’s missed 24 of the Rockets’ 61 games thus far, which is a ton for a team’s franchise player.

Houston Rockets legend Robert Horry explains why concerns over Christian Wood’s size are overblown

Part of the durability concerns with Wood ties directly to his frame, as he’s 6-foot-10 and just 214 pounds, which is nearly identical to Houston Rockets point guard John Wall’s weight of 210 pounds, although Wood has a six-inch height advantage.

Many have questioned if Wood can be expected to play the center position for Rockets coach Stephen Silas, considering Wood’s slender frame.

But former Houston Rockets champion Robert Horry joined FanSided in an exclusive interview and discussed the varying body types of players around the league and explained why Wood’s weight and physical make-up should be of no concern.

“You can’t compare how someone looks on the outside. It’s all about what’s in his heart.

That’s why I’m a big component of what’s in your heart and your head and not this analytical stuff. You put me on the court and you don’t know what I’m going to give you.”

The size concerns are legitimate, as Wood has struggled in the post, due in large part to the fact that he’s so light and easily moved in the paint. We’ve seen Wood get pushed around near the basket and it would seem like adding more muscle would be a solution to that problem, not to mention adding more durability.

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Wood has averaged 21 points, 9.5 rebounds, and 1.5 assists, while making 52.3 percent of his shots and 37.6 percent of his threes on 59.7 percent true shooting. Although Wood’s frame hasn’t hindered him from being an impact player, he’s about 30 pounds lighter than Kevin Durant, which is reason to add more size and muscle to his frame.

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